Cloak Sewing Tutorial: Part One {Cutting Process}

I’m sorry my cloak tutorial is only a week late! It was alot harder than I expected to draw everything up and explain it! If you need more details please ask specific questions in the comments or in an email. Thanks!

To see my first post with pictures of the finished product click here or on the picture!

2nd Finished Cloak

Materials:
3 Yards Outer Fabric
3 Yards Lining Fabric
2 Large Buttons
1 Smaller Button

I used flannel for both the outer fabric and the lining for my latest cloaks, because it was on sale. In the past I have used wool and stretch canvas for the outer fabric and flannel and satin for the lining.

The Cutting Process

To make my pattern is pretty easy but I do it without too many fancy tools. It would probably be more professional if I used quilter’s equipment but I figured there were probably people like me that would like an easy tutorial that didn’t use anything too fancy. This is something an average hobby sewer could make.

Cloak Pattern- Image No 1
Image No 1

1. Layout your fabric on the carpet floor, as shown in image no 1. If you want to (or can cut through all the layers) layout both the lining and the outer fabrics at the both time, so that they match up. It would save you from cutting everything twice.

Layout the Fabric
Step 1- Layout Fabric

 

 

 

 

Cloak Pattern- Image No 2
Image No 2

2. Cut off the excess fabric (this will be saved for the hood) and cut the fold so that you have two separate layers of each fabric. See image no. 2 and cut accordingly.

 

 

Pin in Fabric and Carpet
Step  3- Push Pin Thru Fabric and Carpet
Pin Placements
Pin Placements

3. Stick a pin in the bottom corner of your fabric- stick it through the fabric into the carpet so that it sticks up but is still in place. Look at the picture for step no 3. (This is where you may want to use fancier equipment, but this is a cheap easy way that I do it). Measure 3 feet away from that pin and stick another pin in the bottom of the fabric. Also put a pin in at the 18″ mark. See Pin Placements image.

4. Use your measuring tape to make a straight line from the 18″ mark pin at the bottom of your fabric to the top of the fabric.Stick a pin in at the top and where your middle pin would line up. Use that pin as a middle mark, put the 8″ mark of your measuring tape at the pin and put a pin in at the top of the fabric at Zero and at the 16″ line. You should now have all of the pins in place according to the pin placement image.

 

 

Cloak Pattern- Image No 4
Image No 4

5. Use some yarn (or some sort of string) to make an outline around all of your pins. Your outline should look like image no 4. This is now your pattern, it can be cut carefully with scissors.

Wrap Pin Outline with String
Step No 5

 

 

 

 

 

Cloak Pattern- Image No 5
Panel Explanation
Cloak Pattern- Image No 8
Image No 8

6. The main panel that you just cut out should have 2 layers (of each the lining and the outside if you cut both fabrics at the same time). Fold the top layer(s) in half so that you can easily cut down the middle lengthwise. See Image No 6.

Cloak Pattern- Image No 6

7. The last step of the cutting process is to cut out the hood. The hood is fairly simple, the piece that we saved it the very beginning will be folded in half, as shown in Image No 8. The hood was cut without a pattern, but as long as it has a round corner it will be fine. The only part that matters is that all 4 pieces (two for the outer fabric and two for the inner fabric) are the same. I changed my mind with the hood as you can see in the picture but it worked out well.

Hood Cut Out
Step 7- Hood Shape

This is the last step of the cutting process for the main part of your cloak. Remember- if you didn’t cut out both the outside layer and the inside layer of fabric at the same time you will need to go back and repeat this entire process for whichever fabric you didn’t cut yet.

The real last step is an easy one, using the scraps of both the outer fabric and the inner cut out two rectangles from each fabric. The rectangles should be about 10″x4″. These will be to cover up the slits for the arm holes, they help make the cloak a little bit warmer.

This tutorial will continue this week! It will include all of the sewing steps and the finished product. Thanks for your patience!

Cloaks- The Original Wearable Blanket {Inspiration}

I started off making cloaks last year when I made my red riding hood cape for Halloween. The inspiration was from the ABC Show Once Upon a Time. To see more pictures of my version of the Red Riding Hood Cape click here.

Once Upon a Time Red Riding Hood Cloak
Image from ABC’s Once Upon a Time

Red Riding Hood CloakThe next one I made was a serious step up, a cloak for my sister for her Christmas present. She liked my Red Riding Hood Cloak but also had some other ideas for hers. It had to be a little more useful and warm. She liked the idea for the arm holes like on this Nancy Drew type of cape.

Nancy Drew Cape
Cape Available on Etsy

I made sure to add arm holes and to use thicker material for my sister’s cape. It was also made with a much thicker material and lined with flannel.

2nd Finished Cloak

My sister loves her cloak. My other sisters love it as well- so much that they steal it often. They asked for their own so I made them long capes for Christmas and I am currently working on a tutorial for them. Check back next week and I will have the tutorial for My Sister’s Cloaks.

My Sister's Cloak