Cloak Sewing Tutorial: Part One {Cutting Process}

I’m sorry my cloak tutorial is only a week late! It was alot harder than I expected to draw everything up and explain it! If you need more details please ask specific questions in the comments or in an email. Thanks!

To see my first post with pictures of the finished product click here or on the picture!

2nd Finished Cloak

Materials:
3 Yards Outer Fabric
3 Yards Lining Fabric
2 Large Buttons
1 Smaller Button

I used flannel for both the outer fabric and the lining for my latest cloaks, because it was on sale. In the past I have used wool and stretch canvas for the outer fabric and flannel and satin for the lining.

The Cutting Process

To make my pattern is pretty easy but I do it without too many fancy tools. It would probably be more professional if I used quilter’s equipment but I figured there were probably people like me that would like an easy tutorial that didn’t use anything too fancy. This is something an average hobby sewer could make.

Cloak Pattern- Image No 1
Image No 1

1. Layout your fabric on the carpet floor, as shown in image no 1. If you want to (or can cut through all the layers) layout both the lining and the outer fabrics at the both time, so that they match up. It would save you from cutting everything twice.

Layout the Fabric
Step 1- Layout Fabric

 

 

 

 

Cloak Pattern- Image No 2
Image No 2

2. Cut off the excess fabric (this will be saved for the hood) and cut the fold so that you have two separate layers of each fabric. See image no. 2 and cut accordingly.

 

 

Pin in Fabric and Carpet
Step  3- Push Pin Thru Fabric and Carpet
Pin Placements
Pin Placements

3. Stick a pin in the bottom corner of your fabric- stick it through the fabric into the carpet so that it sticks up but is still in place. Look at the picture for step no 3. (This is where you may want to use fancier equipment, but this is a cheap easy way that I do it). Measure 3 feet away from that pin and stick another pin in the bottom of the fabric. Also put a pin in at the 18″ mark. See Pin Placements image.

4. Use your measuring tape to make a straight line from the 18″ mark pin at the bottom of your fabric to the top of the fabric.Stick a pin in at the top and where your middle pin would line up. Use that pin as a middle mark, put the 8″ mark of your measuring tape at the pin and put a pin in at the top of the fabric at Zero and at the 16″ line. You should now have all of the pins in place according to the pin placement image.

 

 

Cloak Pattern- Image No 4
Image No 4

5. Use some yarn (or some sort of string) to make an outline around all of your pins. Your outline should look like image no 4. This is now your pattern, it can be cut carefully with scissors.

Wrap Pin Outline with String
Step No 5

 

 

 

 

 

Cloak Pattern- Image No 5
Panel Explanation
Cloak Pattern- Image No 8
Image No 8

6. The main panel that you just cut out should have 2 layers (of each the lining and the outside if you cut both fabrics at the same time). Fold the top layer(s) in half so that you can easily cut down the middle lengthwise. See Image No 6.

Cloak Pattern- Image No 6

7. The last step of the cutting process is to cut out the hood. The hood is fairly simple, the piece that we saved it the very beginning will be folded in half, as shown in Image No 8. The hood was cut without a pattern, but as long as it has a round corner it will be fine. The only part that matters is that all 4 pieces (two for the outer fabric and two for the inner fabric) are the same. I changed my mind with the hood as you can see in the picture but it worked out well.

Hood Cut Out
Step 7- Hood Shape

This is the last step of the cutting process for the main part of your cloak. Remember- if you didn’t cut out both the outside layer and the inside layer of fabric at the same time you will need to go back and repeat this entire process for whichever fabric you didn’t cut yet.

The real last step is an easy one, using the scraps of both the outer fabric and the inner cut out two rectangles from each fabric. The rectangles should be about 10″x4″. These will be to cover up the slits for the arm holes, they help make the cloak a little bit warmer.

This tutorial will continue this week! It will include all of the sewing steps and the finished product. Thanks for your patience!

Jeep Sewing Projects

We recently bought a jeep and have been four wheeling every weekend this month. I want to buy accessories for it, but I’m being thrifty as usual and making my own. It sure helps out for making the payment too!

Handle Bar Bag

This turned out to look a little frumpier than I wanted it to. Next time I’ll have to use some heavy backing. I do love that I have all of my stuff close and convenient. There’s always extra space for snacks and for my camera too.

Tool Roll

This is an adult version of a crayon roll! The tools are a little bit odd shaped, so they don’t roll as well as a crayon roll but it is a great way to save space and keep your tools safe and organized. It’s also convenient to have all of your tools in one spot and can be easily carried to wherever you need them.

Fire Extinguisher Holder

Did you know it cost over $20 for one of these? I made it for much less! I finally finished a great easy-to-follow tutorial for how to make your own. Click here to see the full Roll Bar Fire Extinguisher Holder Tutorial.

Blanket

This wasn’t the most important thing I wanted to make but it is always great to have a spare blanket and to use a ton of extra fabric. It’s now my son and my dog’s favorite blanket to fight over. I love the patriotic color theme, it’s like a taste of 4th of July every day!

More Jeep Posts:

Play Mat Bag

I saw this picture on Pinterest a long time ago, but I didn’t have internet access when I went to go make one, so it turned out a bit differently. I had also seen this lego playmatat A Girl and a Glue Gun, so my idea came from that one too. There is a better way to do this, but I didn’t do it that way this time, and who knows if I will make another one any time soon, so after I tell you how I did it I will tell you how you should do it (because I’m bossy!).

Materials:
Fabric for the “mom side”
Fabric for the “kid side”
5 Yards Bias Tape (Homemade or bought)
5 Yards Ribbon or Clothesline

My son’s little so I knew I would be the one carrying around his toys for him. Don’t worry, when he’s bigger he is doing all the work! But I wanted to make this bag cute-ish for me too. I seem to have an obsession with making myself bags, even if it is under the pretense of making it for my kid. So that’s why there’s mom side and kid side fabric.

I did as Kim did for her Lego Play Mat and used a string and pen to make a perfect circle. (I pinned the string down to the corner of the fabric.) I cut out one piece each of my “mom side” and “kid side” fabric, the same sized circle.

Then I made a ton of homemade bias tape. (Hi, I’m Monica, I don’t know if you know this but I’m cheap thrifty, and I am also too lazy to drive to the store) It took FOREVER mostly because someone wanted to be held the entire time and didn’t realize I was making *him* something. So anyway, I made about 15 feet worth of bias tape (the right way too, I usually cheat and don’t cut it on the bias) and pinned it around the edges.

I sewed on the bias tape, threaded the clothesline through it and then decided to add handles. So I made the handles with leftover bias tape and sewed them on.

I realized though using it (and through looking at the pinspiration closer) that it was hard to cinch it together and then to un-cinch it when the baby was ready to play. So I switched to ribbon and cut a few more holes in the bias tape so that the ribbon could be pulled out in a few more places. (Thanks for the idea, Kalli!)

Also, when using it at first I loosely tied the ribbon so that the bag wouldn’t undone, but I added cord stops. (And do you know how long it took me to google that word. I knew what they were but I had no idea what they were called until now!)

So when you make your own, here’s a better way to do it.

1. Cut your circles the way Kim shows us here.

2. Sew handles onto the “mom side”.

3. Make your bias tape. Or buy it. Sew four buttonholes into your bias tape.

4. Sew bias tape on.

5. String your ribbon or thin rope through the buttonholes, add cord stops and tie the ends.

I actually have to go buy two more cord stops before mine is completely finished but we used it for a few vacation days already with out them and I will be using it with just a couple for our next few outings. He never stays on the playmat for long but it is nice to have one small patch of the ground that is free from tiny things he can find. Thanks for suffering through reading about my mistakes have a great day!

My First Quilt- a T-Shirt Quilt

I finally finished my first quilt! I used my husband’s t-shirts to make a quilt for my little boy to have while he’s gone. It made it easier for my husband to go through and get rid of some of his old t-shirts.

Each of the squares are 15×15. For a baby it’s huge, but he will grow into it. I used sheer fusible backing for the t-shirts and there is no batting because it’s hot here and I want the baby to be able to use it all the time. With the fusible backing on the t-shirts and the actual backing it is still plenty thick. I used painter’s tape to make my sideways lines while quilting it, and each line is A Very Hungry Caterpillar Board Book apart. (You know you love my measuring methods!) I used a nice gray for the quilting after finding out that micro-filament is difficult to use.


Car Seat Cover

I have a newborn, and he doesn’t leave my side yet. I still have to eat though, so he has been grocery shopping with me. We got the worst looks from random strangers. I guess they think I should starve and not buy diapers because I just had a baby.

Anyway, that and seeing my friend’s car seat cover (I have seen them called tents) made me want to make one of my own. We bought the fabric to match the green of the car seat and to have simple shapes for him to look at. I bought two yards, and there was plenty extra that I will be using for something cute later.

My friends had plenty of fabric over the back of the car seat where it already has the shade thingy, and I decided I didn’t need to cover the seat anymore than I had to because I actually like the looks of it.

I measured the size I wanted by comparing with a blanket I placed over the car seat. I only wanted it a couple inches shorter and for it not to have square corners at the bottom. The triangles I cut off the bottom edges were used to decorate a burp cloth.

This is the finished project, (I forgot to take pictures while I was making it!) but it is pretty much the same shape that I cut, adding an extra inch and minus the straps. The top is just folded, and I cut the other edges to how I wanted.

After cutting the fabric, I ironed the edges under and pinned them together. I did it around the entire piece and then started sewing around the entire thing.

Next I made the straps. I pinned a scrap onto the now finished main piece and used the scrap to measure out the straps. I left a pin to where I had the scrap, so I would know where to sew on the straps. I cut out four pieces the same size as the scrap.

I took two of them and ironed the edges under and sewed around the edges. I then sewed the button hole on one side. I did the same to the other two pieces to make the other strap.

I pinned the straps on and sewed them on. Then, over where I sewed the strap on I hand sewed the button on.

It works great, except now people at the grocery store ask if they can look at the baby, so I’m lifting it up all the time because I can’t resist showing off my cute kid!