Halloweeen Headband

Materials:Lace (leftover from my trench coat)
Plastic Spider and Web (found at the dollar store-came with bats and rats as well)
Tulle
felt
LOW TEMP Hot Glue
Ribbon (optional, I didn’t use it)

Directions:
Cut out enough lace to go around the headband, and hot glue it to the underside of the headband.

This is where I would add the ribbon, is to the underside of the headband, to cover the hot glue.

Cut a larger piece of the lace, make sure it’s longer as well as wider. You can run it through the sewing machine to ruffle it if you want.

If not, just cut a circle of felt and ruffle the lace around it, and hot glue it. Add strips of tulle and then hot glue your spider web to the headband as well.

That’s it, unless you want to embellish it more. I really like mine, it’s a little big for me but not too overwhelming so I’ll probably be wearing it most of October!

If you check out my new facebook page I posted a picture I found of the dog modeling the headband for me. The baby thought it was hilarious, apparently my husband did not.

See Also: Other Halloween Ideas
Angry Birds Beanie
Incredibles T-shirt
Cowboy Woody Infant Costume

Pinned It, Did It: Toddler Activities

My son is a young toddler (15 months) and has been needing some stimulation. It’s still a little hot to play outside all the time so I decided to try some of the activities I pinned.

Paper Tube Car Ramp

Time Spent Preparing:1 minute
Materials Cost: A few cents for Tape, tube was technically trash
Time it Entertained:10 minutes
Clean-Up:Painless

Ten minutes is alot for a toddler to spend on one activity, atleast for mine it is. He loved the car ramp. He played with it the first time for about ten minutes and then was bored and went to something else. I left it out and after his nap he came back to it for a few more minutes until he figured ripping it off the couch would be more fun.

Finger Painting Inside of a Zip Lock Bag

Time Spent Preparing:2 minutes
Materials Cost: A few cents worth of paint, paper and ziplock bag
Time it Entertained: 2 minutes
Clean-Up:Painless

I hate wasting my ziplock bags, I try not to use stuff that just gets thrown away. With that just as a side thought, this activity wasn’t very entertaining for my son. He may just be too young. I won’t be trying this one until he’s a bit older.

Vinyl Car Stickers

I bought some vinyl, even though I don’t have a machine to cut it. I found out from Kim at A Girl and A Glue Gun that you can cut the vinyl like normal too. You can see her post here.

I also saw this picture on Facebook,(and I did an image search so I could pin it but didn’t find a good source. If you know where it came from let me know, I’ll give them credit!) and loved the idea. Instead of having stick figures of your family they had their guns instead.

I found some silhouettes of the guns that I wanted to represent us through another image search, and put them into paint and sized them and placed them closer together.

I printed it out and taped the paper with masking tape to the vinyl, and cut them out (cutting is a great tv-time activity!). Once they all were cut out I went outside (and yes, it’s still super hot in the middle of the day even though its September!) and tried not to burn my fingers too badly as I wiped the window down with alcohol.

I then peeled the bottom of the gun, and stuck just the bottom to the window. I used the popsicle stick the vinyl came with to push down as I peeled off the rest of the backing so that it stuck nicely to the window. There are still a couple of small air bubbles but it looks fine.

I’m really happy with them. The flag we have on there is vinyl as well, we bought it at a yard sale though. The pirate flag is in fact stolen from my son’s happy meal and I love that too. So I didn’t really need the personalization, my purple car sticks out anyway but it sure does look cool now!

More Personalization:
Decorated Suitcase
Embellished Knit Hats
Iron-On Tractor Shoes

Getting Ready for Halloween

I had a little rant about what I give out instead of candy for Halloween. I didn’t mention that I also gave out princess go-fish games to the tween/teen boys that didn’t dress up. They didn’t even come up with a good excuse either, they just said they didn’t have a costume. Jerks! Haha I hope they loved their treat though.

I also just made this blue angry bird hat for my mom. That’s what she’s wearing instead of a costume. And yes, I know I look creepy in that picture. You try taking a picture like that!

Cute Altered Trench Coat

I recently posted a teaser about a trench coat I found at goodwill. You can see it and my before picture here.

And here’s my finished product! (See Also: Newer Picture of my Trench Coat)

Materials:
10″ of Black Material that matches your coat
32″ of scallopped black lace
10 3/4″ D-rings
Ribbon
Buttons

Directions:

{Taking in the Armpits}
First try your jacket on and see how much the sleeves need to be brought in. Mark it however is best for you, in the armpit, where it would be the most to take in.

Pull your lining away from your jacket, and have your jacket inside out. You may have to cut some of the ties from the jacket and lining. I only cut the ones from the armpit, and you can replace them later. If it’s easy enough I would recommend taking out the whole lining, but for mine I didn’t want to have to re-sew the cuffs. (I know, I’m just lazy!)

Once you figure out how to pull the lining out of the way and have your jacket inside out, you can press your sleeve flat so that you can cut it down to size. Pin where you have marked on your sleeve, and place pins where you want to sew. Also be sure to pin the jacket side as well. In my picture it wasn’t pinned so I drew a red line on where you would pin it. (Think: tapering the sleeve so that it matches the pin in the armpit.)

Also, pin on a ribbon that you can use to sew the lining back to the jacket, like how it was originally.

Sew along where you have it pinned. (I cut out the excess fabric first, but I would recommend doing that last, just in case you mess it up!) After it is sewn you can cut out the excess fabric.

Follow this same process for the lining as well, but as you are sewing the armpit, grab the ribbon from the armpit of your outside and include that into your stitch.

UPDATE: When I first did this I didn’t take in it enough- a year later I finally fixed it and it has more of a dressy look. This is when I should have done it right the first time! (See the post with the new pictures of the trench coat here)

{Sewing on the Corset}
First, cut 10 short pieces of ribbon to about an inch and a half. Light a candle, and singe all of the edges.

Also cut two inches off of your black fabric (the same direction they would at the fabric store, you will need the rest for the ruffles)

Decide how long you want you corset section to be. When it is sewn on, you don’t want it to go much lower than your waist. Mine was about 8 inches long, and each of my d-rings had about an inch between them.

Cut your black fabric to be the height that you just decided on. Fold in the edges and press them. Pin your ribbons holding the D-rings to the strips of black fabric and when you have them lined up the way you want them, pin them to the jacket. I found the easiest way to pin them to the jacket was to slide the jacket onto my ironing board, so that the lining was underneath the ironing board and out of the way.

When you have everything pinned down, you can take it to the sewing machine, and sew the edges of the black fabric. Sew as close to the edge as you can. You can pin the lining out of the way, or just try to be careful that you don’t catch it underneath where you are sewing.

You can string the ribbon in to see how it looks, but I would remove it while you sewed on your ruffles just so that it doesn’t get in the way.

{Adding Ruffles}
Put your jacket back on the ironing board. Create a fold going from the inner edge of the corset piece to the bottom of the coat. This is going to be the edge of your ruffles. Press it on both sides so that you have something visual to help you place the ruffles.

Cut the rest of your black fabric in half (You should have something about 8×32 inches by now). One of the pieces can have about 6 inches trimmed off as well, but leave the other one long.

Hem the edges of each piece so that they won’t fall apart if you ever go to wash the coat. Using a long, loose stitch, sew the gathering stitch on the top of each piece.

Pull one of the strings on your gathering stitch to create the ruffles. Fold the two outside edges over and pin them to the jacket. Pin the top edge to the jacket as well. The top edge may be messy looking but it will be covered by the next row of ruffles. (The very top one will be under the corset’s ribbon and not very noticeable as well)

Sew on both sides and the bottom. (Sorry my picture is after the whole thing was finished because when I was making it I was too excited about finishing to remember to take pictures 🙂

Next cut your lace, it should be about 32 inches long by 8 inches high, with the scallopped edge at the bottom. Pin the lace in place, so that it covers a few inches of the lower ruffle. Sew the three edges just as before. Follow the same idea for the next black piece and the final lace piece.

{Adding Buttons}
The buttons on the front are purely decorative, and are hand sewn onto the front, over where the existing/useful buttons are.

I hope this gave you some ideas to be able to make a cheap coat seem like your perfect $80+ coat! Make sure if you haven’t already to click here and go look at the updated pictures of this trench coat. I took it in a little bit more, and it looks fantastic- and a little bit more dress-like.

For other clothing alteration projects check out these links:
Straps Added to Strapless Dress
Repurposing a Onsie into a Cute Burp Cloth
T-shirt to Un-Tucked Onsie
T-Shirt Embellishment

Trench Coat- Before

If you are like me and in Arizona, you may ask “Why the heck are you wearing a trench coat?!?” and I would tell you that I am wishful thinking, and hoping for cold weather soon. Here we don’t cool down until October. But today It was cool and rainy. It was all the way down to 74 degrees at one point. We haven’t seen that since April- and that was at 3am. So maybe we will get lucky and it will be cool soon, and if it does I’ll be ready.

I found a really nice jacket at Goodwill for $15 and I shouldn’t have bought it because I didn’t really like it. But there was a lady there watching me try it on (because there was a line for the dressing rooms and my son was screaming so I tried on everything over my clothes in front of everyone so I could just leave) and she told me it looked nice on me. I thanked her for the compliment and felt I had to buy, until I got home and remembered it wasn’t what I wanted. It was still really nice, so I decided to make a few alterations to it so that hopefully it will be my one go-to coat and I can get rid of all the rest. (I buy a new coat every year but none of them are exactly what I want because I can’t see paying over $30 for any of them).

So here’s my coat. I love the hood, but I hate that the jacket isn’t very form fitting (I love the ones that are shaped like a dress) and I also hate that the buttons are hidden. I am in love with big buttons on jackets and shirts. I might have bought an ill-fitting skirt once because I loved the buttons. The last thing is that the arms are a little too wide, and will seem even wider once the coat is pulled in so those need to be taken in as well. Well, I’m off to the craft store so I can beautify this jacket!

Here are some of the trench coats on pinterest that inspire me:
Trench Coat with Back Bow
Dress Coat
Corset Backed Trench Coat

Which of these do you think I will style my new jacket after?

I’ll be back tomorrow (hopefully) with a new altered coat!

UPPDATE: The “new” coat can be seen here, and it turned out awesome!

Save the Kitchen Towel! with Kitchen Towel Band

Everyone has a kitchen towel hanging on their oven door, right? There are lots of different ideas for how to get it to stay. Until lately, I would hang mine on and it would fall off. Or the baby would pull it off and it would be on the other side of the house by the time I needed it. I have seen lots of cute alterations I can do to my dish towels to fix the problem, but I like having a regular full size dish towel in reach for when I need it for something else. So in came the hair tie trick.

I just put an elastic band around the dish towel to keep it in place and it worked wonders. The baby hasn’t figured it out and just thinks it’s stuck. I decided it was a great idea and to share a cuter version with all of you. Don’t you hate when you think you’ve come up with something original and then after some research you see it somewhere else? (I totally did that with the nursing cover strap, they were called something else and everyone has thought of them already but they were on etsy under a different name. I didn’t find out until after I made a fool of myself! 🙂 That’s what happened to me today. I found some cute Dish Towel Belts over at Sassy Sanctuary. Lucky for me, she did them a little differently than I would so I am still going to show you my kitchen towel bands!

Materials:
Rubber Band (I still used a hair tie)
Big Silk or Fabric Flower (Three small ones would look cute too)
Scrap of felt
Hot glue
Button

Directions:
Hot glue the bottom of the flower to the rubber band. Glue on leaves as well but on the other side of the rubber band. Glue on the felt or fabric scrap to the back, just to hold everything in place a little bit better. Turn the flower over and add the smaller sections of petals by hot gluing them on. Finally, glue the button on top.

You might have noticed that this is the same idea as making a hair flower. It is, but it’s cooler because it’s for a towel now. Like the cheesy ad I made for it? We could make an infomercial and say, “But wait! if you call right now we’ll throw in two more free!” Because everyone needs 6 of these for all 6 ovens right?!

I thought it was cool, and it sure is useful. How would you embellish it differently?

For other crafty ideas check these posts out:
A Quick Trick to Protect Wood
Turkey Hair Clip (You could clip this to a hair tie to make a seasonal Towel Band!)
Mod Podged Coasters

My Top 5 Posts on Arizona Mama

As of this month, I have been writing for Arizona Mama for one year. It started off with my decorated burp cloth and kept on going from there! Take a look at my most viewed articles in this year.

Number 5: DIY Dog Bed

Number 4: On The Go Applesauce

Number 3: Indoor Clothesline

Number 2: Ruffled Curtains

Last but not least, Number 1: Coke Can Bracelets

Thanks for all of your support and your views, hopefully this next year will be just as productive as last year!

Cowboy Woody Infant Costume


I’m kinda weird when it comes to costumes (check out my Elastagirl Costume). I like to have everything be an exact replica of the movie or exactly like the picture in my head. It’s hard to accept not having them come out perfect because their handmade, but they are closer to perfect than the cheap store bought costumes.

The Shirt
Materials:
Yellow Paint or Dye
Red Paint
White Onsie (You can save time with buying a yellow onsie, but I couldn’t find any that were plain)

The baby didn’t wear this much, so I wasn’t spending too much money on it, so I used what I had. I had a white onsie and the paint. The paint dried very crunchy so I only painted parts of it, and I actually just used acrylic paint and washed it before he wore it. Anyway, paint or dye the shirt yellow. We painted the front down to the waistline, the arms, and a little of the back by the arms. We also left white circles for the buttons. After it dried we painted the red stripes. We just free-handed the lines. Before putting it on the baby we had to stretch it out a whole bunch because of the paint.

The Vest
Materials:
White Fabric
Black Fabric (Something that won’t fray, like from an old t-shirt or felt)

I used a sweater vest that someone had given us to use as a pattern, you can use a onsie or something else, and cut out where the arms would be. I laid the vest flat and drew around the entire vest and cut out two of those in the white. I then folded one of them in half and cut it down the center. I put those two pieces together and cut a v-neck shape and rounded the bottom. (I’m sorry I don’t have pictures of the process for you, I don’t feel that I am explaining this well without them but I’m sure you can figure out something!)

With the black fabric cut out cow spot shapes. It’s just like a cloud and can be whatever you want. This was the funnest part!

With black thread on the top and white thread in your bobbin sew on the cow spots wherever you would like. Since they won’t fray you don’t have to worry how pretty your sewing is as long as they are on there ok! I went with circle-ish shapes getting close to the edges. Ok, they were very rectangular circles, but you can’t tell!

Now you can sew the pieces of your vest together. Put the outsides together and sew the two top sides and the two bottoms sides. The vest was so easy and very cute!

The Boots

Materials:
Pleather (I should say vinyl, that’s what it really is but I scored at Goodwill and got it for just a couple bucks, you can use a cheaper plain brown fabric or something else if you want)
Baby Boot Pattern(I used McCalls M6342)
Embroidery Thread(Optional)
Sharpie

After the pieces were cut out I added design to the boots. There are little lines on the toe and a cactus on the outer side. I started embroidering, but then decided I liked the sharpie look just as much (it was more toy-ish) but I did a little of both and made the boots match. I also added tabs to both sides of both boots. The designs were copied from a picture of the character at disneyland but you can find other pictures online.

Mine were hand sewn because it is hard to maneuver the sewing machine around these tiny shoes. I took shortcuts with the pattern (pleather won’t fray so I didn’t do any unnecessary seams).

After the fact I realize that although they were cute the boots were the biggest waste of time, because they were quite a bit time consuming and the baby kicked them off every time he wore them and I couldn’t even keep them on long enough for the picture.

The Hat
Materials:
Pleather

You might want to go find some sort of pattern for the hat. Or if you are making this for a bigger kid you can find them cheaply everywhere. My dilemma was that my kid has a small head, so this is done kind of oddly. A soft lining would have been nicer for him too.

If you are making your own I used a dinner plate and a bucket hat that fit him to come up with a pattern. Cut out two of the dinner plate. Cut out one of the size of the top of the bucket hat plus an inch or two around. Cut out a rectangular shape that is the height of the bucket hat and long enough to go around the smaller circle (that you made from the top of the bucket hat) plus a couple of inches. Very exact, huh?

Sewing this gets kind of crazy too. If you have a better way, I would love to see it! First sew the rectangular shape to the smaller circle. Start with the right sides together at the edges and try to hold the circle as you feed the rectangle under the presser foot. Go slow and it should be easier than it seems. When you finish there should be ends touching each other. Sew those together with the right sides touching.

Next, put the right sides of your dinner plate circles together. Sew the outer edge. and then turn it inside out. Set the top part of the hat in the center of the dinner plate circles (this will be your brim) and mark where the top part of the hat is going to be. Now cut a small hole in the very center of your brim and cut a line to where you marked. Cut a few more lines from the center to where the top part will be. It should look like this.

Black is the dinner plate piece, the gray is where you marked where the rest of the hat will be, and the red is the cut lines.

Now you should be able to sew the rest of the hat to the brim. Fold the triangle shapes under the rest of the hat (trim them after) and sew the middle piece of the hat to the brim. Now you can trim those triangle shapes from the brim. I told you, it was kind of a tacky way of doing it but it worked.

The Bandana

Materials:
Red T-Shirt Fabric
White Paint Pen

I cut out a piece of a red t-shirt. I guessed on the whole pattern. I looked at a bib, but made it long enough that you could tie. I zig-zag stitched the edges and then my husband drew white X’s all over it.

The Belt
Materials:
Pleather
Belt Buckle

I was thinking about a cute “Woody” copy, but I was on a time crunch and couldn’t finish everything I wanted to do, so Grandpa’s belt buckle worked. I sewed a long strip of the pleather and stapled the buckle on. I wouldn’t do that for an older baby that gets into things but mine wasn’t doing to much of that then. I made sure the bottom of the staple was going towards the jeans so it wasn’t out to catch on anything. I punched a few holes in the pleather and called it good!

The Jeans
Materials:
Jeans

These were the easiest of all! I didn’t do a thing, we already had them!.

The Extras I Didn’t Do
If I had time I would have done these:
-Buttons to the shirt (I left some white circles when I painted but real buttons on the sleeves would have been cool
-A Sheriff Badge(I was looking for sticker that they give out to kids but never found one in time)
-Pull String (I had one of those retractable name badge things I wanted to rig up under the vest and just have a plastic circle showing)